Monday, February 27, 2006

A NEW TWIST TO AN OLD QUESTION

We've all heard the Art vs Quilt question. There are different categories in the shows for 'Art' quilts, and the rest are various 'normal' quilts.. I have a new question concerning miniature quilts. We know that if there is a category for these quilts, it is separate from 'normal' quilts and 'art' quilts.
How do you view miniature quilts? Some of them can be astounding like Diane Gaudynski's wholecloth "A Visit to Provence". I think I would consider many of them 'art' quilts, because their purpose is only for viewing pleasure. In a pinch many of the quilts in the other 'normal quilt' categories, can be used as originally intended.. you can roll up in them to keep warm.. I know that many cringe when we think of many of these ever touching a couch.. I know I am cringing now as I think of my favorite quilt of all time "Magnum Opus: The Book of Kells". 'Art' Quilts might have all kinds of weird things on them that would make it impossible to wrap up in them. Unless you don't worry about putting your eye out with your quilt.
What about miniatures? They aren't good for anything except looking at. Potholders.. coasters.... okay.. I'm kidding.
I have no clue why I am asking this.. I have been thinking a lot about it lately. I have developed a love of making small quilts. When I see a large quilt, I wonder if I could reproduce it in miniature. I'm wondering if I should 'specialize' in miniatures? I know that the prize money isn't as good for miniatures as it is for other categories, which leads me to think they aren't respected in the quilting world. But on the other hand, the categories usually don't have as much competition either. And the quilts in them are either really good, or not.
The AQS has made the step of increasing the prize money, and having a "Best Miniature" purchase prize in this category like they do in the other categories. I'm sure that will lend a greater air of respectability, at least in the AQS show. The museum is going to have a miniature quilt section or something.. at least I know they are going to display them. Maybe the purchase prize this year will be the first of a nice collection for the museum.

I don't think I would be wasting my time making miniatures, any more than I wasted my time making the "Skeletons". I could do traditional designs, but making them small would make them more unique, so I wouldn't be like everyone else. I don't like being like everyone else.. in case you haven't noticed.
Then I can focus my intense desire for detail in a smaller area. It may take a long time to attend to the details in a small quilt.. but believe me, it takes longer to worry about it in a big quilt.. And look at it this way, no more wrestling to baste a big quilt.. one of my less favorite things to do.. and I can buy the best fabric, and not have to use as much... Postage to ship the quilt costs less... As you can see, it isn't going to take much to convince me..

1 comment:

Scrapmaker said...

You obviously are developing a passion for the minature, so I say go for it. Just think how easy it would be to pack up a trunk show! Jen